Tropical Cyclone Report

Hurricane Wilma

15-25 October 2005

 

Richard J. Pasch, Eric S. Blake, Hugh D. Cobb III, and David P. Roberts

National Hurricane Center

12 January 2006

 

 

            Wilma formed and became an extremely intense hurricane over the northwestern Caribbean Sea.  It had the all-time lowest central pressure for an Atlantic basin hurricane, and it devastated the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula.  Wilma also inflicted extensive damage over southern Florida.

 

 

a.              Synoptic History

 

Wilma had a complicated beginning.  During the second week of October, an unusually large, monsoon-like lower-tropospheric circulation and a broad area of disturbed weather developed over much of the Caribbean Sea.  This system appeared to have been enhanced by an extensive area of diffluent flow to the south and southwest of an upper-level cyclone over the southwestern Atlantic.  The easternmost portion of this low pressure area moved northeastward and merged with an extratropical cyclone.  However, a more concentrated area of disturbed weather and surface low pressure formed near Jamaica by 14 October, possibly aided by a couple of tropical waves traversing the Caribbean during this time.  Dvorak satellite classifications were initiated on this system at 1200 UTC 15 October.  By 1800 UTC that day the surface circulation became well-enough defined, with sufficiently organized deep convection, to designate that a tropical depression had formed, centered about 190 n mi east-southeast of Grand Cayman.  Figure 1 is a “best track” chart of the tropical cyclone’s path, and time series of the wind and pressure are shown in Figs. 2 and 3, respectively.  The best track positions and intensities are listed in Table 1.

 

A weak and ill-defined steering flow prevailed for the first couple of days of Wilma’s existence, with a 500 mb high covering the Gulf of Mexico and another mid-tropospheric anticyclone located well to the east-northeast of the tropical cyclone.  The depression moved slowly and erratically westward to west-southwestward for a day or so and then drifted south-southwestward to southward for a day or two.  There was only slow strengthening during this period, and the system is estimated to have become a tropical storm at 0600 UTC 17 October.  On 18 October Wilma turned toward the west-northwest and, while doing so, strengthened into a hurricane.  Later that day, a remarkable, explosive strengthening episode began and continued through early on 19 October.  By 0600 UTC 19 October, Wilma’s winds had increased to near 150 kt (category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale).  In the span of just 24 hours, Wilma had intensified from a 60-kt tropical storm to a 150-kt category 5 hurricane, an unprecedented event for an Atlantic tropical cyclone.  It is fortunate that this ultra-rapid strengthening took place over open waters, apparently void of watercraft, and not just prior to a landfall.  Wilma reached its peak sustained wind speed of 160 kt at around 1200 UTC 19 October.  During the strengthening episode, Air Force reconnaissance observations indicated that the eye of the hurricane contracted to a diameter of 2 n mi; this is the smallest eye known to National Hurricane Center (NHC) staff.  The estimated minimum central pressure at the time of peak intensity is 882 mb, which is a new record low value for a hurricane in the Atlantic basin.  Indeed, the actual minimum pressure may well have been lower than this value, as noted in the following section.

 

Wilma maintained category 5 status until 20 October, when its winds decreased to 130 kt, and the tiny eye was replaced by one about 40 n mi across.  Interestingly, the hurricane would retain this large, or an even larger, eye ranging from about 40 to 60 n mi in diameter, for most of the remainder of its lifetime.  By 21 October, as mid-level ridging to the northeast of Wilma increased somewhat and a series of shortwave troughs in the westerlies began to erode the high over the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane turned toward the northwest and north-northwest, taking aim at the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.  Wilma’s maximum winds were still near 130 kt (category 4 intensity) when its center made landfall on the island of Cozumel around 2145 UTC 21 October, and it was probably only slightly weaker (but still category 4 intensity) when it crossed the coast of the Yucatan peninsula about 6 hours later.  On 22 October, the mid-tropospheric high pressure area to the north of Wilma essentially dissipated, and the hurricane moved slowly northward, crossing and severely battering the extreme northeastern Yucatan peninsula.  Wilma emerged into the southern Gulf of Mexico around 0000 UTC 23 October, with maximum winds of near 85 kt.  Although Wilma’s intensity had been reduced due to its passage over land, it was still a large and powerful hurricane.

 

A vigorous mid-tropospheric trough, moving eastward from the central United States, provided an increasingly strong southwesterly steering current that accelerated Wilma northeastward toward southern Florida.  As the upper-level flow over the hurricane increased, so too did the vertical shear, and by early on 24 October the environmental 850-200 mb shear (averaged over an annulus about 100 to 400 n mi from the center) was roughly 25 kt.  Despite the strong shear in its surroundings, Wilma strengthened over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico and its winds reached about 110 kt as it approached Florida.  Maximum sustained winds were estimated to be near 105 kt (category 3 intensity) when landfall of the center occurred in southwestern Florida near Cape Romano around 1030 UTC 24 October.  Continuing to accelerate and now moving at a forward speed of 20 to 25 kt, the hurricane crossed the southern Florida peninsula in 4.5 hours, with the center emerging into the Atlantic just southeast of Jupiter around 1500 UTC.  Maximum winds had decreased to near 95 kt (category 2) during the crossing of Florida.  A vigorous cold front associated with the mid-tropospheric trough swept across the area to the west of Wilma, yet the cooler and drier air behind the front could not fully penetrate the inner core of the hurricane to weaken it.  Very shortly after departing Florida, the hurricane re-intensified one last time, and its winds again reached 110 kt around 0000 UTC 25 October.  Thereafter, Wilma finally succumbed to an unfavorable atmospheric environment and lost strength while racing northeastward at 40-50 kt over the western Atlantic.  It became an extratropical cyclone around 0000 UTC 26 October while centered about 200 n mi southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia.  This extratropical low was absorbed by another extratropical cyclone located over eastern Nova Scotia around 0000 UTC 27 October.

 

b.              Meteorological Statistics

 

            Observations in Wilma (Figs. 2 and 3) include satellite-based Dvorak technique intensity estimates from the Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch (TAFB), the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) and the U. S. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), as well as flight-level and dropwindsonde observations from flights of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the U. S. Air Force Reserve Command (AFRES) and NOAA Aircraft Operations Center WP-3D aircraft.  Microwave satellite imagery from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites, the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the NASA QuikSCAT, NASA Aqua, and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites were also useful in tracking Wilma.

Highest winds measured by the AFRES were 168 kt at a flight level of 700 mb in the southeastern eyewall at 0610 UTC 19 October, when Wilma was over the northwestern Caribbean Sea.  Using a standard eyewall reduction factor (ratio of surface to flight level winds of  0.9) yields a surface wind of 151 kt.  Since the central pressure was still falling at the time of the last pass of the aircraft through the eye at around 0800 UTC, it is likely that the winds also increased some more from 0800 to 1200 UTC.  Therefore the peak intensity of Wilma is estimated to be 160 kt at 1200 UTC 19 October.  When Wilma was over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico, and approaching south Florida, the AFRES measured a 700 mb wind of 135 kt at 0646 UTC 24 October, apparently associated with a short-lived mesocyclone in the southeastern eyewall.  Because of the strong southwesterly shear, the ratio of surface to flight level winds was probably smaller than that typical for the hurricane eyewall.  Therefore the surface to 700 mb wind speed ratio is reduced from the normal 0.9 to 0.8, resulting in an estimated intensity of 110 kt at 0600 UTC 24 October.  Subsequent sampling of the southeastern eyewall by the aircraft and Doppler radar observations showed that the winds had diminished somewhat, so the intensity of Wilma at landfall in southwestern Florida has been set at 105 kt. 

Wilma’s deepening rate over the northwestern Caribbean Sea, from late on 18 October to early on 19 October, was incredible.  Over the period from 2310 UTC to 0433 UTC, the central pressure fell from 954 mb to 901 mb, which is a deepening rate of 9.9 mb per hour.  The minimum central pressure measured by dropsonde was 884 mb at 0801 UTC 19 October.  Surface winds from this dropsonde were measured to be 23 kt, so the dropsonde probably did not capture the lowest pressure in Wilma’s eye.  Therefore the pressure around 0800 UTC was probably a couple of mb lower than 884, estimated at 882 mb.  This is the lowest central pressure in the NHC records for the Atlantic basin.  Given that the pressure was still falling at this time, it is possible that the pressure then dropped a little below 882 mb.  It should be added that the largest 6-, 12-, and 24-h drops in best track central pressure for Wilma, 54 mb from 0000 to 0600 UTC 19 October, 83 mb from 1800 UTC 18 October to 0600 UTC 19 October, and 97 mb from 1200 UTC 18 October to 1200 UTC 19 October, respectively, are by far the largest in the available records for these periods going back to 1851.  The previous record 6-h deepening was 38 mb in Hurricane Beulah, September 1967, the previous record 12-h deepening was 48 mb in Hurricane Allen, August 1980, and the previous record 24-h deepening was 72 mb in Hurricane Gilbert, September 1988.

 

            Ship reports of winds of tropical storm-force associated with Wilma are given in Table 2, and selected surface observations from land stations and data buoys are given in Table 3.  A 10-min average wind of 87 kt with a gust to 113 kt was observed in Cancun, Mexico, but it is not certain if these were the maximum values at that station.  Islas Mujeres, very near Cancun, experienced hurricane-force winds in gusts for nearly a 24-h period from 21-22 October.

 

The highest sustained wind measured at an official surface observing site in Florida was a 15-min average speed of 80 kt from a South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) observation site, L006, in Lake Okeechobee.  It should be noted that another SFWMD platform, LZ40, located only about 5 n mi north of L006 recorded a 15-min wind speed of 79 kt at the same time.  It is reasonable to assume that these measurements correspond to a 1-min average wind speed of at least 90 kt.  A number of official surface wind observation (ASOS) sites in Miami-Dade and Broward Counties stopped reporting data at their highest noted sustained wind speeds, such as Opa-Locka Airport at 74 kt and Pompano Beach Airport at 72 kt.  It is likely that higher sustained wind speeds occurred at these sites.  Data from the Miami WSR-88D Doppler radar indicated a peak velocity of 138 kt at an elevation of about 5000 ft over western Broward County.  A comparison of Doppler velocities with co-located, official 2-min and 1-min surface wind measurements in Miami-Dade in Broward Counties suggests that the ratios of surface to 5000 ft sustained wind velocities over southeastern Florida in Wilma were likely in the range of 0.65 to 0.70.  This would result in a maximum surface wind speed estimate of 90-95 kt.

Based on the surface observations and the Doppler data it can be concluded that most of the southeastern Florida peninsula experienced at least category 1 hurricane conditions, and that some parts of northern Miami-Dade County, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties likely had category 2 hurricane conditions, including wind gusts to near 100 kt, at the standard 10 m height above ground.  It is expected that the upper floors of the many high rise buildings in South Florida experienced wind speeds greater than occurred there at 10 m.

A storm surge of 4 to 8 ft was reported from coastal Collier Counter. It is likely, however, that higher storm surges occurred over uninhabited areas of southwestern Florida to the south of where Wilma made landfall.  Storm surges of 4 to 5 ft were observed over much of the lower and middle Florida Keys, locally to near 7 ft.  However, a storm surge of near 9 ft was estimated visually in the Marathon area.  Storm surges were generally in the 4 to 5 ft range over the upper Keys.  This resulted in considerable flooding over substantial portions of the Keys.  Relatively minor storm surge flooding occurred on the Biscayne Bay shoreline of Dade County.

            Wilma produced torrential rainfall as it moved slowly over portions of the eastern Yucatan Peninsula.  According to the Meteorological Service of Mexico, a 24-h rainfall total of 62.05 inches was measured at Islas Mujeres.  Because the hurricane moved quickly across the southern Florida peninsula, however, the rain amounts were not very large in Florida and storm totals ranged generally from 3 to 7 inches.  Some locations in southeast Florida had totals of only 1 to 2 inches -- or less.

Wilma produced 10 tornadoes over the Florida peninsula on 23-24 October: one each in Collier, Hardee, Highlands, Indian River, Okeechobee, and Polk Counties, and four in Brevard County.

Figure 4 is an image of Wilma while it was located over South Florida from the Miami WSR-88D radar.  Note the large area that was impacted by the eyewall.

c.              Casualty and Damage Statistics

           

            Twenty-two deaths have been directly attributed to Wilma: 12 in Haiti, 1 in Jamaica, 4 in Mexico, and 5 in Florida.

 

            Damage was reported to have been very severe in portions of the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula, but detailed information from Mexico is not available.  This dealt a major blow to the tourist industry in that area.  There was major flooding from storm surge and/or wave action in portions of western Cuba.  In southern Florida, damage was unusually widespread, including numerous downed trees, substantial crop losses, downed power lines and poles, broken windows, extensive roof damage, and destruction of mobile homes.  Wilma caused the largest disruption to electrical service ever experienced in Florida.  Media reports indicate up to 98 per cent of South Florida lost electrical service, and Florida Power and Light reported outages in 42 Florida counties.  A preliminary amount of total insured damage compiled by the Property Claims Service is $6.1 billion.  Using a doubling of insured losses to obtain the total damage gives a current estimate of Wilma’s U.S. damage to be $12.2 billion.

 

d.              Forecast and Warning Critique

 

Average official track errors (with the number of cases in parentheses) for Wilma were 29 (39), 42 (37), 61 (35), 84 (33), 136 (29), 264 (25), and 382 (21) n mi for the 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h forecasts, respectively.  For 12 through 72 h, these errors are less than the average official track errors for the 10-yr period 1995-2004[1], but they exceed the 2001-2004 average errors at 96 and 120 h.  There were some large along-track errors in the official forecasts for these longer time ranges; and the along-track biases indicate that the 4- and 5-day NHC forecasts for Wilma were, in general, too fast.  Although the track guidance models were in general agreement that Wilma would cross the Florida peninsula, there was considerable spread in predicted forward speed. This was associated with large uncertainty in the timing of the hurricane strike on Florida.  Table 4 shows the mean track errors for the various models and model combinations, and for the official forecasts.  On average, the most accurate numerical guidance through 48 h was provided by the Florida State University Superensemble, and for 72 through 120 h by the NCEP Global Ensemble and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office global model.  Interestingly, the NCEP Global Ensemble had a mean 5-day track error that was about 100 n mi less than the NCEP Global Forecast System (the parent model of the ensemble).           

 

            Average official intensity errors were 11, 18, 22, 22, 30, 27, and 25 kt for the 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h forecasts, respectively.  These errors are quite a bit larger than the average official intensity errors over the 10-yr period 1995-2004.  There was a negative bias (i.e. underforecast of intensity) at all forecast times.  As might be expected for such a rapidly strengthening hurricane, there were some very large individual underforecasts of intensity when Wilma was over the northwestern Caribbean Sea – by as much as 80 kt at 48 h.  The official forecasts did not explicitly predict Wilma to regain category 3 intensity before hitting Florida, but the NHC Tropical Cyclone Discussions on 22-23 October did note the possibility that the system could again be a major hurricane as it approached the coast of Florida.

 

            Within a day of Wilma’s genesis over the western Caribbean Sea, the Tropical Weather Outlooks issued by the National Hurricane Center anticipated the formation of a tropical depression, including (just prior to genesis) the possibility of development into a hurricane.

 

            Table 5 lists the watches and warnings issued for Wilma.  There was considerable lead time in the issuance of the hurricane warnings for the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula, as these warnings were posted well over 48 h prior to landfall in that area.  Likewise the hurricane warning for Florida was issued well in advance, 31.5 h before Wilma’s center made landfall there.

 

e.         Acknowledgements

 

            Most of the surface observations in this report were provided by the meteorological services of Mexico and Cuba, and National Weather Service Forecast Offices (NWSFOs) in Key West, Miami, Tampa, Melbourne, Jacksonville and Tallahassee Florida.  Dan Brown, Lixion Avila, Jack Beven, James Franklin, Rick Knabb, Max Mayfield, Ed Rappaport, and Stacy Stewart of TPC/NHC provided useful comments.  Colin McAdie of TPC/NHC along with Robert Molleda and Pablo Santos of the Miami NWSFO helped to analyze the WSR-88D data.  Eric Swartz of the SFWMD helped with the wind observations from the SFMWD network.


Table 1.  Best track for Hurricane Wilma, 15-25 October 2005.

Date/Time

(UTC)

Latitude

(°N)

Longitude

(°W)

Pressure

(mb)

Wind Speed

(kt)

Stage

15 / 1800

17.6

 78.5

1004

 25

 tropical depression 

16 / 0000

17.6

 78.8

1004

 25

"

16 / 0600

17.5

 79.0

1003

 30

"

16 / 1200

17.5

 79.2

1003

 30

"

16 / 1800

17.5

 79.4

1002

 30

"

17 / 0000

17.4

 79.6

1001

 30

"

17 / 0600

16.9

 79.6

1000

 35

tropical storm

17 / 1200

16.3

 79.7

 999

 40

"

17 / 1800

16.0

 79.8

 997

 45

"

18 / 0000

15.8

 79.9

 988

 55

"

18 / 0600

15.7

 79.9

 982

 60

"

18 / 1200

16.2

 80.3

 979

 65

hurricane

18 / 1800

16.6

 81.1

 975

 75

"

19 / 0000

16.6

 81.8

 946

130

"

19 / 0600

17.0

 82.2

 892

150

"

19 / 1200

17.3

 82.8

 882

160

"

19 / 1800

17.4

 83.4

 892

140

"

20 / 0000

17.9

 84.0

 892

135

"

20 / 0600

18.1

 84.7

 901

130

"

20 / 1200

18.3

 85.2

 910

130

"

20 / 1800

18.6

 85.5

 917

130

"

21 / 0000

19.1

 85.8

 924

130

"

21 / 0600

19.5

 86.1

 930

130

"

21 / 1200

20.1

 86.4

 929

125

"

21 / 1800

20.3

 86.7

 926

120

"

22 / 0000

20.6

 86.8

 930

120

"

22 / 0600

20.8

 87.0

 935

110

"

22 / 1200

21.0

 87.1

 947

100

"

22 / 1800

21.3

 87.1

 958

 85

"

23 / 0000

21.6

 87.0

 960

 85

"

23 / 0600

21.8

 86.8

 962

 85

"

23 / 1200

22.4

 86.1

 961

 85

"

23 / 1800

23.1

 85.4

 963

 90

"

24 / 0000

24.0

 84.3

 958

 95

"

24 / 0600

25.0

 83.1

 953

110

"

24 / 1200

26.2

 81.0

 950

95

"

24 / 1800

28.0

 78.8

 955

105

"

25 / 0000

30.1

 76.0

 955

110

"

25 / 0600

33.3

 72.0

 963

100

"

25 / 1200

36.8

 67.9

 970

 90

"

25 / 1800

40.5

 63.5

 976

 75

hurricane

26 / 0000

42.5

 60.0

 978

 60

extratropical

26 / 0600

44.0

 57.5

 982

 55

"

26 / 1200

45.0

 55.0

 986

 50

"

26 / 1800

45.5

 52.0

 990

 40

"

27 / 0000

 

 

 

 

merged with low

21 / 2145

20.6

86.8

927

130

landfall on Cozumel, Mexico

22 / 0330

20.8

86.9

933

115

landfall near Puerto Morelos, Mexico

24 / 1030

25.9

81.7

950

105

landfall near Cape Romano, Florida

19 / 1200

17.3

 82.8

 882

160

minimum pressure

  

  

 


Table 2.           Selected ship and drifting buoy reports with winds of at least 34 kt for Hurricane Wilma, 15-25 October 2005.

Date/Time (UTC)

Ship call sign

 

Latitude

(°N)

Longitude

(°W)

Wind

dir/speed (kt)

Pressure

(mb)

20 / 1200

WCY845

 18.8

  80.2

130 /  36

1007.0

20 / 2100

DDPH 

 18.9

  82.3

140 /  35

1004.0

23 / 2100

A8FN3

 20.3

  84.2

240 /  43

1001.6

23 / 2100

P3GY9

 21.8

  85.3

260 /  46

 993.0

24 / 0000

ZCAM4

 23.4

  88.1

340 /  37

1002.2

24 / 0000

V7HD2

 28.3

  88.0

010 /  37

1009.0

24 / 0600

WCY845

 20.0

  82.6

230 /  35

1004.0

24 / 0600

KS049

 26.4

  85.2

010 /  39

 993.8

24 / 0900

KS049

 25.7

  86.0

350 /  41

 997.6

24 / 1054

ANCF1

 28.2

  82.8

010 /  37

 999.0

24 / 1154

FHPF1

 28.1

  82.8

020 /  39

 999.6

24 / 1200

H3VT 

 25.6

  77.1

160 /  44

1002.0

24 / 1200

WAAH 

 26.8

  76.9

160 /  37

1000.0

24 / 1300

PMYF1

 26.9

  80.6

110 /  43

 -99.0

24 / 1500

WAAH 

 26.2

  76.2

170 /  39

 999.5

24 / 1800

MYSU5

 24.1

  74.8

190 /  49

1005.6

24 / 1800

V7HD2

 28.3

  87.7

340 /  36

1015.0

24 / 1800

41625

 27.6

  70.5

210 /  43

1002.7

24 / 1900

41646

 25.3

  75.5

200 /  41

1001.2

24 / 2000

41646

 25.3

  75.5

200 /  39

1000.3

24 / 2100

WAAH 

 25.7

  75.8

230 /  44

 997.8

24 / 2128

TYBG1

 31.6

  79.9

330 /  35

 996.0

24 / 2200

3FMX7

 36.4

  74.6

020 /  47

 996.4

24 / 2200

41630

 26.7

  74.0

220 /  41

 999.5

24 / 2233

SKMG1

 31.5

  80.2

310 /  37

 998.0

24 / 2333

SKMG1

 31.5

  80.2

310 /  39

 999.4

25 / 0000

ZCDF4

 23.2

  79.0

270 /  38

1007.9

25 / 0000

PDBO 

 28.6

  67.2

210 /  35

1008.8

25 / 0000

KRHX 

 35.5

  75.2

020 /  41

 992.0

25 / 0000

41625

 27.7

  70.5

200 /  39

1005.7

25 / 0050

41934

 28.6

  72.5

*** /  41

 997.4

25 / 0059

BRBN4

 39.6

  74.2

070 /  35

1002.4

25 / 0128

TYBG1

 31.6

  79.9

310 /  39

1000.5

25 / 0200

41625

 27.8

  70.4

210 /  41

1006.2

25 / 0300

KRHX 

 36.2

  75.3

050 /  40

 990.8

25 / 0459

AVAN4

 39.1

  74.7

070 /  35

 995.0

25 / 0500

3FMX7

 37.4

  74.4

020 /  48

 989.2

25 / 0600

A8ER9

 34.9

  75.2

350 /  37

 989.0

25 / 0600

ZCDC2

 37.0

  75.1

030 /  38

 991.0

25 / 0600

A8CJ2

 37.4

  74.2

050 /  37

 987.0

25 / 0600

KAQP 

 40.2

  66.3

090 /  36

 997.5

25 / 0659

BRBN4

 39.6

  74.2

050 /  35

 994.1

25 / 0900

KRPB 

 35.5

  75.2

300 /  37

 990.1

25 / 0900

WMVF 

 41.5

  70.7

070 /  35

1001.0

25 / 1100

3FMX7

 38.0

  74.2

010 /  37

 986.6

25 / 1200

V2AW5

 27.3

  69.0

190 /  37

1015.0

25 / 1200

ZCDC2

 37.7

  74.7

350 /  35

 990.3

25 / 1200

SHJC 

 40.1

  70.1

070 /  58

 990.4

25 / 1200

VRWG6

 43.8

  62.9

070 /  40

1013.0

25 / 1500

VOTV 

 43.5

  70.0

040 /  43

1002.0

 

 

 

 


Table 3.           Selected surface observations for Hurricane Wilma, 15-25 October 2005.

Location

Minimum Sea Level Pressure

Maximum Surface

Wind Speed

Storm surge

(ft)c

Storm

tide

(ft)d

Total

rain

(in)

Date/

time

(UTC)

Press.

(mb)

Date/

time

(UTC)a

Sustained

(kt)b

Gust

(kt)

Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cancun

 

 

22/0000

87

113

 

 

 

Cozumel

 

928.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isla Mujeres

22/1930

968.6

22/0200

71

94

 

 

62.05

Siankaan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29.25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bahia Honda

 

 

23/2225

49

60

 

 

 

Caibarien

 

 

24/1459

27

34

 

 

 

Casa Blanca

 

 

24/0040

62

73

 

 

 

Colon

 

 

24/0503

27

43

 

 

 

Cuba  Francia

 

 

23/1650

38

48

 

 

 

Indio Hatuey

 

 

24/0500

27

37

 

 

 

Isabel Rubio

 

 

23/0220

38

51

 

 

 

Jovellanos

 

 

24/0755

29

39

 

 

 

La Fe

 

 

20/1256

41

51

 

 

 

La Palma

 

 

23/2240

48

60

 

 

 

Paso Real de San Diego

 

 

23/1705

24

42

 

 

 

Pinar del Rio

 

 

23/2150

38

50

 

 

 

Playa Giron

 

 

23/1959

32

46

 

 

 

Punta del Este

 

 

20/1635

40

50

 

 

 

San Juan y Martinez

 

 

23/1625

47

53

 

 

 

Santa Lucia

 

 

23/2315

52

65

 

 

 

Santiago de la Vegas

 

 

23/2025

43

57

 

 

 

Santo Domingo

 

 

24/0550

28

38

 

 

 

Union de Reyes

 

 

24/0615

26

35

 

 

 

Varadero

 

 

24/0602

43

53

 

 

 

Yabu

 

 

24/0552

29

39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 W TNT  (FCMP)

 

 

24/1311

77

101

 

 

 

20 Mile Bend  (S-5AE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.33

7W Weston FCMP Tower T1

(26.1oN  80.5oW)

24/1254

952.2

24/1429

77

92

 

 

 

Alligator Alley West

 (S-140)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.61

Andytown  (ANDF1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.47

Belle Glade  (BELLW)

SFWMD

24/1215

953.6

24/1515

68

102

 

 

 

Big Cypress  (BCSI)

24/1130

951.4

24/1345

35

70

 

 

5.19

Bings Landing  (NOS)

 

 

24/2100

18

37

0.86

 

 

Brighton  (S-129)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.65

Brooksville (KBKV)

24/1206

1000.3

24/1829

25

34

 

 

1.08

Cache  (LPIF1)

 

 

24/1115

57

97

 

 

 

Chekika  (CHKF1)

 

 

24/1235

67

98

 

 

 

Chokoloskee  (USGS)

 

 

 

 

 

7.0

 

 

Clermont  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.82

Clewiston  (CFSW)

 

 

24/1415

53

73

 

 

 

Clewiston Field Station (COE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.31

Coral Springs  (CSPF1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.67

Crescent City  CREF1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.02

Daytona Beach  (KDAB)

24/1857

997.3

24/1857

25

38

 

 

4.82

Daytona Beach   COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.25

Deland  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.18

Everglades City (EGC)

 

 

24/0955

49

 

 

 

 

FCMP  Tower  T0

(25.9oN  81.3oW)

24/1050

952.2

24/1227

63

82

 

 

 

FCMP  Tower  T2

(25.9oN  80.9oW)

24/1149

955.2

24/1057

71

95

 

 

 

Fernandina Beach (NOS)

24/2100

1001.2

 

 

 

1.13

 

 

FIU Main  (FCMP)

 

 

24/1411

 60e

83e

 

 

 

Forever  FL COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.00

Fort Lauderdale

(KFLL)

24/1336

961.4

24/1211

61

86

 

 

3.04

Fort Lauderdale Executive (KFXE)

24/1133

977.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fort Myers  (KFMY)

24/1102

976.0

24/1216

54

66

 

 

 

Fort Myers  (KRSW)

24/1153

972.6

24/1229

51

69

 

 

5.44

Fort Pierce  (KFPR)

24/1448

968.5

24/1606

 45e

 68e

 

 

5.47

Fort Pierce WP COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.02

Hastings  ARC   HTGF1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.65

Hialeah  (HIAF1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.23

Hillsboro  Canal  (S-2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.25

Islamorada

 

 

24/0926

 

94

 

 

 

Jacksonville Int’l Airport (KJAX)

24/2058

1001.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.78

Key West  (KEYW)

 

 

24/0616

62

72

 

 

2.02

Key West Harbor  (NOS)

24/0818

977.2

24/0836

51

74

2.76

 

 

Kissimmee  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.73

Lake Okeechobee (L001)

SFWMD

 

 

24/1515

74

93

 

 

 

Lake Okeechobee (L006)

SFWMD

 

 

24/1500

80

97

 

 

7.00

Lake Okeechobee SW (LOKEEM)  SFWMD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.14

Lake Okeechobee (LZ40)

SFWMD

 

 

24/1500

79

95

 

 

 

Lakeland  (KLAL)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.34

Lakeport  (S-131)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.00

Leesburg  (KLEE)

24/1846

999.0

24/1806

28

35

 

 

4.88

Lisbon  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.03

Loxahatchee  (LXWS)

24/1300

954.3

24/1545

62

98

 

 

3.12

Loxahatchee West

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.82

MacDill AFB  (KMCF)

 

 

24/1055

21

37

 

 

2.53

Mayport  (NOS)

24/2030

1000.6

24/2030

25

33

0.82

 

 

Melbourne (KMLB)

24/1520

987.1

24/1600

       42

52

 

 

4.25

Melbourne  (NWS)

 

 

24/1607

 

67

 

 

4.96

Miami (KMIA)

24/1225

967.5

24/1230

58

80

 

 

0.76

Miccosukee School

 

 

24/1100

 

93

 

 

 

Miles City  (RKIF1)

 

 

24/1235

34

76

 

 

4.69

NAS Jacksonville

 (KNIP)

24/1959

1000.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

NASA LC39B

(28.6oN  80.6oW)

 

 

24/1640

 56

82

 

 

2.79

Naples  (KAPF)

24/0942

965.8

24/1207

 53e

 71e

 

 

6.63

Naples Pier  (NPSF1,NOS)

24/1024

960.9

24/1200

73

89

2.64

 

 

Oasis  (OASF1)

 

 

24/1330

46

86

 

 

2.33

Ocala  (KOCF)

24/1735

1001.0

24/1735

23

34

 

 

 

Ochoppi FCMP Tower T2

 

 

24/1227

64

84

 

 

 

Ochopee  (OCOF1)

 

 

24/1335

47

 

 

 

3.74

Opa Locka (KOPF)

24/1316

964.8

24/1216

 74e

 91e

 

 

 

Orlando  (KMCO)

24/1437

994.6

24/1212

35

42

 

 

5.17

Orlando  (KORL)

24/1434

997.0

24/1723

30

43

 

 

3.88

Orlando East  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.61

Ortona  (ORTF1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.52

Palm Bay  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.47

Palmdale  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.56

Patrick AFB

 

 

24/1521

 

64

 

 

6.95

Pinecastle Bombing Range (KNAE)

24/1851

998.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plymouth  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.81

Pompano Beach (KPMP)

24/1240

 961.1e

24/1240

 72e

 85e

 

 

 

Ponce Inlet  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.07

Port Canaveral  USCG 

24/1600

992.0

24/1500

45

69

 

 

 

Punta Gorda  (KPGD)

24/1153

985.8

24/1252

45

61

 

 

3.93

ROTNWX  (SFWMD)

24/1145

951.0

24/1200

 56e

 87e

 

 

 

S7WX  (SFWMD)

24/1215

952.3

24/1530

56

90

 

 

 

S-140  (SFWMD)

 

 

24/1345

58

94

 

 

 

STA5WX  (SFWMD)

24/1145

950.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Augustine  (KSGJ)

24/1945

999.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Petersburg  (KPIE)

24/1145

997.6

24/1707

33

43

 

 

1.64

St. Petersburg  (KSPG)

24/1153

995.9

24/1144

32

41

 

 

 

Sanford  (KSFB)

24/1820

995.9

24/1859

28

37

 

 

3.59

Sanford  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.22

Sarasota  (KSRQ)

24/1042

991.9

24/1350

31

42

 

 

3.81

Stuart  (COOP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.55

Sweetwater (Miami WFO)

24/1210

966.5

24/1147

57

90

 

 

4.42

Tampa (KTPA)

24/1130

997.3

24/1629

30

38

 

 

1.44

Tenraw  (ENPF1)

 

 

24/1120

66

92

 

 

2.64

Titusville  COOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.90

Vaca Key (NOS)

24/0924

983.0

24/1412

 

52

6.43

 

 

Vandenburg  (KVDF)

 

 

24/1654

23

36

 

 

 

Venice 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.45

Vero Beach  (KVRB)

24/1531

975.3

24/1353

35e

48e

 

 

5.53

Vero Beach  (COOP)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.50

Vilano Beach  (NOS)

 

 

24/1800

27

37

1.77

 

 

  Virginia Key  (VAKF1)

24/1300

972.4

24/1318

65

87

3.61

 

 

West Palm Beach (KPBI)

24/1225

975.0

24/1310

71

88

 

 

1.07

West Kendall (KTMB)

24/1152

970.5

24/1133

 50e

 72e

 

 

1.18

Winter Haven  (KGIF)

24/1236

995.3

24/1630

31

40

 

 

4.77

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glynco Airport (KBQK)

24/2019

1001.4

24/2059

15

22

 

 

 

New Brunswick (KNRB)

24/2053

1000.7

24/0536

21

27

 

 

 

Saint Simons Island (KSSI)

24/2120

1001.0

24/1949

18

27

0.52

 

1.69

Waycross  (KAYS)

24/2058

1003.0

24/2058

21

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buoy/CMAN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy  41009

(28.5oN 80.2oW)

24/1720

985.2

24/1720

52

68

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy  41010

(29.0oN 78.5oW)

24/1950

969.5

24/2050

62

82

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy  41012

(30.0oN 80.6oW)

24/1950

995.3

24/1950

37

45

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy  42003

(26.1oN 85.9oW)

23/2050

997.8

24/1020

36        (10 min)

47

 

 

 

Buoy  42013

(27.2oN 83.0oW)

24/1010

993.1

24/1110

41

49

 

 

 

Buoy  42023

(26.1oN 83.1oW)

24/0759

982.5

24/0959

49

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy  42036

(28.5oN 84.5oW)

24/1150

1002.3

24/0850

37

43

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 42056

(19.9oN 85.1oW)

21/0800

986.6

21/0416

67

81

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 42057

(17.6oN 80.7oW)

18/2200

998.1

19/0600

50

59

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44004

(38.5oN  70.5oW)

25/0050

1002.1

25/0050

37

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44005

(43.2oN  69.2oW)

25/1750

992.4

25/1650

39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44007

(43.5oN  70.1oW)

25/1650

997.6

25/1650

35

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44008

(40.5oN  69.4oW)

25/1350

984.9

25/1350

39

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44009

(38.5oN  74.7oW)

25/0650

989.1

25/0750

37

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44013

(42.4oN  70.7oW)

25/1650

993.8

25/1550

37

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44017

(40.7oN  72.0oW)

25/1550

988.1

25/1250

41

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44018

(41.3oN  69.3oW)

25/1350

987.4

25/1450

37

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44025

(40.3oN  73.2oW)

25/1450

988.7

25/0950

39

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44027

(44.3oN  67.3oW)

25/1750

997.5

25/1750

39

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44034

(44.1oN  68.1oW)

25/1704

999.9

25/1704

35

 

 

 

 

NOAA Buoy 44142

(42.5oN  64.0oW)

25/1700

992.4

25/1700

37

 

 

 

 

Anclote Key  (ANCF1)

(28.2oN  82.8oW)

 

 

24/1054

37

47

 

 

 

Big Carlos Pass  (BGCF1)

(26.4oN  81.9oW)

24/1054

969.2

24/1054

56

76

 

 

 

Clearwater Beach (CWBF1)

(28.0oN  82.8oW)

 

 

24/1400

41

48

 

 

 

Cedar Key  (CDRF1)

(29.1oN  83.0oW)

24/1100

1003.2

24/1650

20

33

 

 

 

Duck Pier  (DUCN7)

(36.2oN 75.7oW)

24/2200

998.4

24/2130

37

 

 

 

 

Fowey Rocks  (FWYF1)

(25.6oN 80.1oW)

24/1243

975.3

24/1159

88

107

 

 

 

Fort Myers  (FMRF1)

(26.7oN  81.9oW)

 

 

24/1242

46

62

 

 

 

Fred Howard

(COMPS FHP)

 

 

24/1154

39

49

 

 

 

Homosassa 

(COMPS HOM)

24/1754

1001.0

24/1654

31

 

 

 

 

Isle of Shoals  (IOSN3)

(43.0oN  70.6oW)

25/1600

995.4

25/1600

46

 

 

 

 

Long Key  (LONF1)

(24.8oN 80.9oW)

24/1100

982.2

24/0930

57

76

4.0

 

 

Mt Desert Rock  MDRM1)

(44.0o N 68.1oW)

25/1700

997.1

25/1700

49

 

 

 

 

Matinicus Rock  (MISM1)

(43.8oN  68.9oW)

25/1700

997.1

25/1400

45